December 14, 2019

States’ Businesses, Way of Life Bolstered by Land & Wildlife

Posted on 05. Nov, 2012 by Stephan Helgesen in Economy, Energy/Environment, Social/Cultural

Nearly Half of Westerners Rely on Land & Wildlife for Recreation.

DENVER — A new state-by-state analysis by the Center for Western Priorities shows that abundant fish and wildlife on public lands are essential for the long-term health of Western economies.

In 2011, wildlife-related recreation contributed $3 billion into Colorado’s economy. Wildlife enthusiasts and sportsmen and women contributed nearly $1 billion to New Mexico’s economy, and in Montana, they contributed $1.4 billion.

Aside from the economic boon public lands provide, they are also part of our way of life. Regardless of industry, a considerable portion of Westerners participate in wildlife-based recreation.

Approximately 4 out of 10 New Mexicans Participate in Wildlife-Based Recreation
Approximately 4 out of 10 Montanans Participate in Wildlife-Based Recreation
Approximately 4 out of 10 Utahans Participate in Wildlife-Based Recreation
Approximately 5 out of 10 Coloradoans Participate in Wildlife-Based Recreation
Approximately 6 out of 10 Wyomingites Participate in Wildlife-Based Recreation

To view full analysis and interactive charts click here.

Maintaining abundant fish and wildlife is important for the long-term health of our Western economies. Westerners and visitors love to travel around our region, visit our public lands, and hunt, fish or merely observe our wildlife. Money spent by those hunters, anglers, and wildlife enthusiasts provides a critical source of revenue for local economies across the Rocky Mountain West.

A recent survey released by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service illustrates the importance of protecting and enhancing wildlife habitat. Men, women and children throughout the Rockies spend their free time exploring our open spaces, viewing wildlife, hunting game and fishing in our streams, lakes and reservoirs.

In New Mexico, nearly 4 out of 10 residents partake in some form of wildlife-related recreation, be it hunting, fishing or wildlife viewing. In Colorado, 5 out of every 10 residents participate in wildlife-associated recreational activities.[i]

Approximately 4 out of 10 New Mexicans Participate in Wildlife-Based Recreation
Approximately 4 out of 10 Montanans Participate in Wildlife-Based Recreation
Approximately 4 out of 10 Utahans Participate in Wildlife-Based Recreation
Approximately 5 out of 10 Coloradoans Participate in Wildlife-Based Recreation
Approximately 6 out of 10 Wyomingites Participate in Wildlife-Based Recreation

In 2011, wildlife-related recreation contributed $3 billion into Colorado’s economy. Wildlife enthusiasts and sportsmen and women contributed nearly $1 billion to New Mexico’s economy, and in Montana, they contributed $1.4 billion. That money’s going to local retailers, community grocery stores, gas stations, hotels, and outfitters. [ii]

In order to protect these jobs and businesses that so many Western families depend on, we need responsible oil and gas development that accounts for wildlife’s importance to our Western way of life and our Western economies. That means ensuring energy development isn’t done in a way that damages our public lands and wildlife resources.

[i] 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation.
[ii] 2011 National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation.

This article was submitted by the Center for Western Priorities

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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